The Children of Gaza

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Tells the story of what Gazans suffered in the 22-day Israeli invasion of the narrow strip, and how they are coping with the miserable aftereffects of the war.





Narration:

More than 1,300 Palestinian were killed in the Israeli onslaught on Gaza. 50% of those killed were women and children. Many children have also been injured in the back to back explosions.



Narration:

Gaza was under attack from land, from the sea and from the air. The war that had been planned on the 27th of December had the most impact on the young and helpless.

According to Palestinian health officials, 300 of the 1300 killed in the war were children. The war had happened 4 months ago but the their condition was still alarming. According to the latest report from the region, the children who had lost their families, relatives and everything else started taking medication to rid themselves of the traumatic scenes that haunted them. Many children we killed in the 22-day war. They fell on the ground like drops of rain one after another. Those who have survived are still plagued by nightmares and want to return to their homes despite what has happened to them.



Narration:

Despite what was said above, there are still sad and horrifying scenes from the war that have had damaging psychological effects on the children. Those who have been exposed to scenes of violence and tyranny have become violent and belligerent and have taken up arms.



Narration:

There’s a place in this city that half of the world has forgotten about. The people living there do not have access to electricity.

90% of the people do not have access to clean drinking water even making them more susceptible to contagious diseases or an epidemic. 65% of the medicines prescribed by doctors is procured from what is left in the storage houses.

Still, Israel has been preventing the basic activities in Gaza. The houses, schools, and hospitals destroyed in the war cannot be reconstructed, and we cannot find the materials needed to fix the water-pipes and other damage to the infrastructure. The Israelis are not even allowing education material supplied by UNICEF to get into Gaza.



Narration:

Given the siege and other restrictions imposed by Israel, it is acutely difficult to provide people with foodstuff and other basic necessities. This was even more difficult during the bombardments.

It’s been four months since the ceasefire was called, but we are still getting just a fraction of the relief supplies donated by international organizations. The Israelis are trying to politicize the humanitarian aid for the Gaza Strip.



Narration:

Despite the suffocating Israeli blockade, we are trying to defuse the impacts of the war, for instance by creating places like the “Katan” day care center where children can play in fields, study in the library and learn things. We are doing our utmost within our means to remove the traumas of war from the minds of the children.

Interview:

A teachers talks about the provisions in this cultural and education center for children. Facilities like musical instruments, painting paraphernalia, and other educational program.



Narration:

The psychological impact of the war on children is manifest in their drawings. They have witnessed sad feelings hacked into their memories. They express their feelings, hopes and desires in their drawings and at times quite outstandingly.



Interview:

The teacher talks again about a drawing made by a kid of a forty-year-old village plus other drawings of the occupation of their land and homes.



Narration:

we are like trees. We have roots, and our roots help us grow, but when we do grow up, they cut us down. They commit every crime in the book against us and do whatever they feel like to us.

But we are still here… and we are not going anywhere.



Narration:

hundreds of thousands of Palestinians have either been made homeless or sent to exile from their own homeland. From the 10 million Palestinians in the world, only four million live in Palestine… and even they have been forced to live in areas other than their birthplace, as refugees. Right now there are 8 refugee agencies in Gaza.



El Nazrit, El Boreig, Beach, Han Uniz, Rafa, Deir-el-Balah, El Maghazi, and Jebal Ali. According to the figures released in Gaza, there are 863.772 refugees and 881.423 others live in camps.



Narration:

Jebal Ali is one of the refugee camps packed with poor children. These kids should be in school studying… instead they are frittering away their time in streets.



Narration:

Many families have been broken up and the staff members of business organizations live here in the Jebal Ali camp. This was one of Israel’s main objectives when it launched the assault on Gaza.

Three UN schools that were supposed to be used as a security shield are now being used as shelters by a large number of Palestinians but under the control of the Israelis. In one of the bloody Israeli attacks on a UN School in this camp, 42 people were killed.



Narration:

young and old, have taken refuge near their demolished houses… and if they don’t want to live in the ruins…they must get on with their lives in tents or other forms of shelter made using pieces of cloth. Some of them have taken refuge on the ruins and rubble. Maybe they haven’t been able to find anything to set up a shelter with.

Life is extremely difficult for children living in the chaos and confusion here. They need to be strong to maintain their mental health so they won’t end up in more adverse conditions.



Interview:

They are putting a lot of pressure on us to leave. And because we had no security, we move to Gaza. Then they destroyed our homes. We used to live in an area called Aseera… they have torn down all the buildings there.

We don’t have a real life. It began to rain a few days ago and the

temperature dropped.

We had to build a fire to keep warm…. but it

wasn’t enough… and it kept raining… life is tough. You see kids who

run away at the faintest sound… when they here the roar of thunder,

they think it’s another Israeli attack.

It’s all because they are

psychologically fatigued. We live in these tents… what can we do? The

Israelis don’t give us enough care… and the little they do is aimed at

keeping us from the public eye. They don’t protect us against the hot

sun, or the rain or the cold. What do you think life in a tent is

really like?



Interview:

What is it that we can do?! We left our own homes to come

here… the children are scared of the conditions here… the cold, the

horror, the uncertainty…



Interview:

Im 14. Im from the Sultan family/ im a descendent of the

Sultan family/ im from a royal family.

His name is Oun Mohammed. He is 12. No organization or institution is

helping us, they don’t even know who we are. Before the last attack on

Gaza, I took him to an organization… they demanded 100 shekels. I told

them we had no money.

So they totally ignored us and refused to put

his name on their list. We are not getting any help whatsoever from

them. What can I do now? Where can I take him? He only plays near here

and has the right to live just like any other kid. But no one is

paying any attention…



Narration:

According to figures from local sources, some 100,000

people from among 20,000 families are now homeless. For them life goes

on, on its own and war is part of their daily routine. The children in

Gaza play like other children in the world, but the only difference is

the children here have to play in the midst of a war and homelessness.

They can still play, but the traumas of war continue to haunt them…

and unfortunately it doesn’t seem to matter to anyone how these poor

kids should leave those bitter memories behind them.



Interview:

He used to have a normal life like his peers. During the

last round of the Israeli attacks, we stayed indoors, and we didn’t

think the war would last long… but we were forced to stay inside our

home for 15 days… as the war went on, we asked the Red Cross to take

us to someplace else.

They told us they would be here for only a

couple of hours and then they would leave. They were still here after

two days. We left our home and started walking with white flags in our

hands. Thank God we were not hurt after walking a few kilometers. When

we returned home, they started dropping bombs … it was horrifying. He

had an epileptic fit… we took him to a psychologist right away and we

hope he’ll get better soon.



Narration:

The Israeli attacks from the North and South have reduced

Gaza to ruins. Official buildings, homes, and shops have all been

wrecked. And the people who have survived the war are trying to

continue with the lives.





Interview:

He didn’t move at all during the war and when he was home.

He would even want to go to the bathroom on his own. But when the war

ended and we went back home, when we open the door to the yard… this

kid went straight to the toilet in the house and spend a few minutes

in there alone, while there were times in the past he wouldn’t move a

muscle for 24 hours.

I can’t use the toilets here( in this camp), they

are filthy. No one goes to the toilets here. When I need to used the

toilet, I go to my uncle’s place.











Narration:

More than 1,300 Palestinian were killed in the Israeli onslaught on Gaza. 50% of those killed were women and children. Many children have also been injured in the back to back explosions.



Narration:

Gaza was under attack from land, from the sea and from the air. The war that had been planned on the 27th of December had the most impact on the young and helpless.

According to Palestinian health officials, 300 of the 1300 killed in the war were children. The war had happened 4 months ago but the their condition was still alarming. According to the latest report from the region, the children who had lost their families, relatives and everything else started taking medication to rid themselves of the traumatic scenes that haunted them. Many children we killed in the 22-day war. They fell on the ground like drops of rain one after another. Those who have survived are still plagued by nightmares and want to return to their homes despite what has happened to them.



Narration:

Despite what was said above, there are still sad and horrifying scenes from the war that have had damaging psychological effects on the children. Those who have been exposed to scenes of violence and tyranny have become violent and belligerent and have taken up arms.



Narration:

There’s a place in this city that half of the world has forgotten about. The people living there do not have access to electricity.

90% of the people do not have access to clean drinking water even making them more susceptible to contagious diseases or an epidemic. 65% of the medicines prescribed by doctors is procured from what is left in the storage houses.

Still, Israel has been preventing the basic activities in Gaza. The houses, schools, and hospitals destroyed in the war cannot be reconstructed, and we cannot find the materials needed to fix the water-pipes and other damage to the infrastructure. The Israelis are not even allowing education material supplied by UNICEF to get into Gaza.



Narration:

Given the siege and other restrictions imposed by Israel, it is acutely difficult to provide people with foodstuff and other basic necessities. This was even more difficult during the bombardments.

It’s been four months since the ceasefire was called, but we are still getting just a fraction of the relief supplies donated by international organizations. The Israelis are trying to politicize the humanitarian aid for the Gaza Strip.



Narration:

Despite the suffocating Israeli blockade, we are trying to defuse the impacts of the war, for instance by creating places like the “Katan” day care center where children can play in fields, study in the library and learn things. We are doing our utmost within our means to remove the traumas of war from the minds of the children.

Interview:

A teachers talks about the provisions in this cultural and education center for children. Facilities like musical instruments, painting paraphernalia, and other educational program.



Narration:

The psychological impact of the war on children is manifest in their drawings. They have witnessed sad feelings hacked into their memories. They express their feelings, hopes and desires in their drawings and at times quite outstandingly.



Interview:

The teacher talks again about a drawing made by a kid of a forty-year-old village plus other drawings of the occupation of their land and homes.



Narration:

we are like trees. We have roots, and our roots help us grow, but when we do grow up, they cut us down. They commit every crime in the book against us and do whatever they feel like to us.

But we are still here… and we are not going anywhere.



Narration:

hundreds of thousands of Palestinians have either been made homeless or sent to exile from their own homeland. From the 10 million Palestinians in the world, only four million live in Palestine… and even they have been forced to live in areas other than their birthplace, as refugees. Right now there are 8 refugee agencies in Gaza.



El Nazrit, El Boreig, Beach, Han Uniz, Rafa, Deir-el-Balah, El Maghazi, and Jebal Ali. According to the figures released in Gaza, there are 863.772 refugees and 881.423 others live in camps.



Narration:

Jebal Ali is one of the refugee camps packed with poor children. These kids should be in school studying… instead they are frittering away their time in streets.



Narration:

Many families have been broken up and the staff members of business organizations live here in the Jebal Ali camp. This was one of Israel’s main objectives when it launched the assault on Gaza.

Three UN schools that were supposed to be used as a security shield are now being used as shelters by a large number of Palestinians but under the control of the Israelis. In one of the bloody Israeli attacks on a UN School in this camp, 42 people were killed.



Narration:

young and old, have taken refuge near their demolished houses… and if they don’t want to live in the ruins…they must get on with their lives in tents or other forms of shelter made using pieces of cloth. Some of them have taken refuge on the ruins and rubble. Maybe they haven’t been able to find anything to set up a shelter with.

Life is extremely difficult for children living in the chaos and confusion here. They need to be strong to maintain their mental health so they won’t end up in more adverse conditions.



Interview:

They are putting a lot of pressure on us to leave. And because we had no security, we move to Gaza. Then they destroyed our homes. We used to live in an area called Aseera… they have torn down all the buildings there.

We don’t have a real life. It began to rain a few days ago and the

temperature dropped.

We had to build a fire to keep warm…. but it

wasn’t enough… and it kept raining… life is tough. You see kids who

run away at the faintest sound… when they here the roar of thunder,

they think it’s another Israeli attack.

It’s all because they are

psychologically fatigued. We live in these tents… what can we do? The

Israelis don’t give us enough care… and the little they do is aimed at

keeping us from the public eye. They don’t protect us against the hot

sun, or the rain or the cold. What do you think life in a tent is

really like?



Interview:

What is it that we can do?! We left our own homes to come

here… the children are scared of the conditions here… the cold, the

horror, the uncertainty…



Interview:

Im 14. Im from the Sultan family/ im a descendent of the

Sultan family/ im from a royal family.

His name is Oun Mohammed. He is 12. No organization or institution is

helping us, they don’t even know who we are. Before the last attack on

Gaza, I took him to an organization… they demanded 100 shekels. I told

them we had no money.

So they totally ignored us and refused to put

his name on their list. We are not getting any help whatsoever from

them. What can I do now? Where can I take him? He only plays near here

and has the right to live just like any other kid. But no one is

paying any attention…



Narration:

According to figures from local sources, some 100,000

people from among 20,000 families are now homeless. For them life goes

on, on its own and war is part of their daily routine. The children in

Gaza play like other children in the world, but the only difference is

the children here have to play in the midst of a war and homelessness.

They can still play, but the traumas of war continue to haunt them…

and unfortunately it doesn’t seem to matter to anyone how these poor

kids should leave those bitter memories behind them.



Interview:

He used to have a normal life like his peers. During the

last round of the Israeli attacks, we stayed indoors, and we didn’t

think the war would last long… but we were forced to stay inside our

home for 15 days… as the war went on, we asked the Red Cross to take

us to someplace else.

They told us they would be here for only a

couple of hours and then they would leave. They were still here after

two days. We left our home and started walking with white flags in our

hands. Thank God we were not hurt after walking a few kilometers. When

we returned home, they started dropping bombs … it was horrifying. He

had an epileptic fit… we took him to a psychologist right away and we

hope he’ll get better soon.



Narration:

The Israeli attacks from the North and South have reduced

Gaza to ruins. Official buildings, homes, and shops have all been

wrecked. And the people who have survived the war are trying to

continue with the lives.





Interview:

He didn’t move at all during the war and when he was home.

He would even want to go to the bathroom on his own. But when the war

ended and we went back home, when we open the door to the yard… this

kid went straight to the toilet in the house and spend a few minutes

in there alone, while there were times in the past he wouldn’t move a

muscle for 24 hours.

I can’t use the toilets here( in this camp), they

are filthy. No one goes to the toilets here. When I need to used the

toilet, I go to my uncle’s place.











Narration:

More than 1,300 Palestinian were killed in the Israeli onslaught on Gaza. 50% of those killed were women and children. Many children have also been injured in the back to back explosions.



Narration:

Gaza was under attack from land, from the sea and from the air. The war that had been planned on the 27th of December had the most impact on the young and helpless.

According to Palestinian health officials, 300 of the 1300 killed in the war were children. The war had happened 4 months ago but the their condition was still alarming. According to the latest report from the region, the children who had lost their families, relatives and everything else started taking medication to rid themselves of the traumatic scenes that haunted them. Many children we killed in the 22-day war. They fell on the ground like drops of rain one after another. Those who have survived are still plagued by nightmares and want to return to their homes despite what has happened to them.



Narration:

Despite what was said above, there are still sad and horrifying scenes from the war that have had damaging psychological effects on the children. Those who have been exposed to scenes of violence and tyranny have become violent and belligerent and have taken up arms.



Narration:

There’s a place in this city that half of the world has forgotten about. The people living there do not have access to electricity.

90% of the people do not have access to clean drinking water even making them more susceptible to contagious diseases or an epidemic. 65% of the medicines prescribed by doctors is procured from what is left in the storage houses.

Still, Israel has been preventing the basic activities in Gaza. The houses, schools, and hospitals destroyed in the war cannot be reconstructed, and we cannot find the materials needed to fix the water-pipes and other damage to the infrastructure. The Israelis are not even allowing education material supplied by UNICEF to get into Gaza.



Narration:

Given the siege and other restrictions imposed by Israel, it is acutely difficult to provide people with foodstuff and other basic necessities. This was even more difficult during the bombardments.

It’s been four months since the ceasefire was called, but we are still getting just a fraction of the relief supplies donated by international organizations. The Israelis are trying to politicize the humanitarian aid for the Gaza Strip.



Narration:

Despite the suffocating Israeli blockade, we are trying to defuse the impacts of the war, for instance by creating places like the “Katan” day care center where children can play in fields, study in the library and learn things. We are doing our utmost within our means to remove the traumas of war from the minds of the children.

Interview:

A teachers talks about the provisions in this cultural and education center for children. Facilities like musical instruments, painting paraphernalia, and other educational program.



Narration:

The psychological impact of the war on children is manifest in their drawings. They have witnessed sad feelings hacked into their memories. They express their feelings, hopes and desires in their drawings and at times quite outstandingly.



Interview:

The teacher talks again about a drawing made by a kid of a forty-year-old village plus other drawings of the occupation of their land and homes.



Narration:

we are like trees. We have roots, and our roots help us grow, but when we do grow up, they cut us down. They commit every crime in the book against us and do whatever they feel like to us.

But we are still here… and we are not going anywhere.



Narration:

hundreds of thousands of Palestinians have either been made homeless or sent to exile from their own homeland. From the 10 million Palestinians in the world, only four million live in Palestine… and even they have been forced to live in areas other than their birthplace, as refugees. Right now there are 8 refugee agencies in Gaza.



El Nazrit, El Boreig, Beach, Han Uniz, Rafa, Deir-el-Balah, El Maghazi, and Jebal Ali. According to the figures released in Gaza, there are 863.772 refugees and 881.423 others live in camps.



Narration:

Jebal Ali is one of the refugee camps packed with poor children. These kids should be in school studying… instead they are frittering away their time in streets.



Narration:

Many families have been broken up and the staff members of business organizations live here in the Jebal Ali camp. This was one of Israel’s main objectives when it launched the assault on Gaza.

Three UN schools that were supposed to be used as a security shield are now being used as shelters by a large number of Palestinians but under the control of the Israelis. In one of the bloody Israeli attacks on a UN School in this camp, 42 people were killed.



Narration:

young and old, have taken refuge near their demolished houses… and if they don’t want to live in the ruins…they must get on with their lives in tents or other forms of shelter made using pieces of cloth. Some of them have taken refuge on the ruins and rubble. Maybe they haven’t been able to find anything to set up a shelter with.

Life is extremely difficult for children living in the chaos and confusion here. They need to be strong to maintain their mental health so they won’t end up in more adverse conditions.



Interview:

They are putting a lot of pressure on us to leave. And because we had no security, we move to Gaza. Then they destroyed our homes. We used to live in an area called Aseera… they have torn down all the buildings there.

We don’t have a real life. It began to rain a few days ago and the

temperature dropped.

We had to build a fire to keep warm…. but it

wasn’t enough… and it kept raining… life is tough. You see kids who

run away at the faintest sound… when they here the roar of thunder,

they think it’s another Israeli attack.

It’s all because they are

psychologically fatigued. We live in these tents… what can we do? The

Israelis don’t give us enough care… and the little they do is aimed at

keeping us from the public eye. They don’t protect us against the hot

sun, or the rain or the cold. What do you think life in a tent is

really like?



Interview:

What is it that we can do?! We left our own homes to come

here… the children are scared of the conditions here… the cold, the

horror, the uncertainty…



Interview:

Im 14. Im from the Sultan family/ im a descendent of the

Sultan family/ im from a royal family.

His name is Oun Mohammed. He is 12. No organization or institution is

helping us, they don’t even know who we are. Before the last attack on

Gaza, I took him to an organization… they demanded 100 shekels. I told

them we had no money.

So they totally ignored us and refused to put

his name on their list. We are not getting any help whatsoever from

them. What can I do now? Where can I take him? He only plays near here

and has the right to live just like any other kid. But no one is

paying any attention…



Narration:

According to figures from local sources, some 100,000

people from among 20,000 families are now homeless. For them life goes

on, on its own and war is part of their daily routine. The children in

Gaza play like other children in the world, but the only difference is

the children here have to play in the midst of a war and homelessness.

They can still play, but the traumas of war continue to haunt them…

and unfortunately it doesn’t seem to matter to anyone how these poor

kids should leave those bitter memories behind them.



Interview:

He used to have a normal life like his peers. During the

last round of the Israeli attacks, we stayed indoors, and we didn’t

think the war would last long… but we were forced to stay inside our

home for 15 days… as the war went on, we asked the Red Cross to take

us to someplace else.

They told us they would be here for only a

couple of hours and then they would leave. They were still here after

two days. We left our home and started walking with white flags in our

hands. Thank God we were not hurt after walking a few kilometers. When

we returned home, they started dropping bombs … it was horrifying. He

had an epileptic fit… we took him to a psychologist right away and we

hope he’ll get better soon.



Narration:

The Israeli attacks from the North and South have reduced

Gaza to ruins. Official buildings, homes, and shops have all been

wrecked. And the people who have survived the war are trying to

continue with the lives.





Interview:

He didn’t move at all during the war and when he was home.

He would even want to go to the bathroom on his own. But when the war

ended and we went back home, when we open the door to the yard… this

kid went straight to the toilet in the house and spend a few minutes

in there alone, while there were times in the past he wouldn’t move a

muscle for 24 hours.

I can’t use the toilets here( in this camp), they

are filthy. No one goes to the toilets here. When I need to used the

toilet, I go to my uncle’s place.







   

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